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Reinvention, Adaptation Remains Key During The Pandemic

Reinvention, Adaptation Remains Key During The Pandemic

These are unprecedented times, as the impacts of COVID-19 continues to evolve at a rapid pace. Among others, gyms and fitness studios, along with a slew of other retailers, have been forced to shut their doors during the pandemic. The key, though, is to adapt and reinvent.

Carlsbad Kickboxing Club, for example, has done just that and quickly moved to teaching live online classes. “While learning this new normal has certainly not been a smooth process, it is our new normal and we are adapting,” says Carlsbad Kickboxing Club owner Rolando Montano.

What is most important for the Club, Montano adds, is to continue to support its members the way they support the Club.

“We will continue to motivate each other to get through this,” he adds.

Carlsbad Kickboxing Club has taken that motivation and support just one step further and loaned out its equipment free of charge including heavy bags and mitts and pads to those members who have chosen to remain active in these challenging times.

“We are doing our best to adapt to this new reality and it will make us stronger,” Montano continued. “On-demand virtual classes and step by step instructional videos could even remain part of our program moving forward and I truly believe this setback will make us stronger.”

Overall, the COVID-19 certainly have presented challenges unlike any other to the health and wellness industry, but thanks in part to small business owners like Carlsbad Kickboxing Club, who truly care about being connected to their members while not in a physical location, this too shall pass. “We will continue to keep our members, our family, active, motivated and above all, supported.”

You can still support Carlsbad Kickboxing Club from the comfort of your home with Zoom https://us04web.zoom.us/s/795137884?pwd=aXNVaE55dE5NeFJDVlJFamtOdCt5QT09. Email us @ carlsbadkickboxing@gmail.com or DM us on INSTAGRAM @carlsbadkickboxingclub for your password.

Covid – 19 and Muay Thai Training Tips From the Safety of Your Home

Covid – 19 and Muay Thai Training Tips From the Safety of Your Home

As we are all following orders to stay home to limit the spread of coronavirus, just because you are shut out of the gym, doesn’t mean you should give up on the idea of fitness entirely. Carlsbad Kickboxing Club head coach Xavier Barker, for example, is making sure to eat as healthy as possible, keep sugar intake low, and exercise at home with walks and runs outside. There are also plenty of muay thai boxing drills you can do at home that will not only help you to keep your distance, but will also maintain your sanity and help you stay in shape. 

Below are just a few of our favorites. 

Cardio: Whether it be running, doing high knees, keep taps, burpees or jumping rope (or even just rotating your wrists in the same motion and hop over an imaginary rope), it is keep to be sure to build up your endurance and get your heart pumping. 

Technique Practice: Practice your drills in a realistic way. Put on all those pads and strike accurately and hard. Maybe work in some of those jab, cross, hook, kick combinations you practice in classes, but do it at the correct speed with the correct technique. Pretend your imaginary partner then takes their turn and more around defending yourself. Make this fighting as realistic as you possibly can. 

Shadow Boxing: Performed completely by yourself (win), shadow boxing is the perfect opportunity for you to practice all those strikes, defense moves, cardio and more that you have learned at Carlsbad Kickboxing Club. Although it might feel strange if it is your first time, all you have to do is move around in any space you might have—whether it be living room, garage, backyard—and focus on staying balanced and using footwork. 

If you have a Heavy Bag: Quarantine or not, hitting a heavy bag will help improve technique, stamina and strength. Start by warming up with movement drills to practice footwork and get the blood flowing. This about drills you practiced in class. Maybe an elbow drill such as out of your fighting stance or while clinching the bag or a speed jab drill. Doing some switch kick to switch knee drills, or a high kick and low power kick drill will also help strengthen what you have. Punching and kicking combinations will help bring it all together. Try moving around the bag when practicing these various techniques. 

Overall, anything you can do to help maintain the skills you have already learned to keep your stamina for when we all return will be helpful. But is more important during these strange times is to also maintain a healthy mind. On that front, coach Barker also talked about his own personal strategy. 

For his mind, he says he writes in a gratitude journal each morning and evening just jotting a few things down that he is grateful for every day. Coach Barker also is cooking and learning new recipes and also tries to meditate every morning and evening for five to 10 minutes. “Just breathing and sitting still goes a long way.” 

You can still support Carlsbad Kickboxing Club from the comfort of your home with Zoom https://us04web.zoom.us/s/795137884?pwd=aXNVaE55dE5NeFJDVlJFamtOdCt5QT09. Email us @ carlsbadkickboxing@gmail.com or DM us on INSTAGRAM @carlsbadkickboxingclub for your password

Carlsbad Kickboxing Club fighter Makes the USA Team.

Carlsbad Kickboxing Club fighter Makes the USA Team.

14 year old Joey Siplyak takes on the world in the toughest junior amateur tournament in Bangkok Thailand 2017.

As a whole, Team USA was able to capture 6 medals: 3 gold, 2 bronze , and 1 silver medal. Bekah Irwin (Age 16) of Houston Muay Thai became the first American to win 2 gold medals and earned the Best Female Fighter award!

Joey Siplyak is prepares for an adventure of a lifetime!

After an outstanding performance in the USMTO Arizona Tournament in May 2017, Carlsbad Kickboxing’s very own Joey Siplyak (14 years old) retained 2 championship titles in 2 different weight divisions. Winning title in two different weight divisions was the first time this has happened at the USMTO Arizona Tournament, and it secured him a spot on the USMF Team. As a member of the USMF Team Joey flew out to Bangkok, Thailand in August 2017 to compete as an amateur in the prestigious Muay Thai tournament, IFMA Youth World Championships.

With only two months’ notice to be ready for the IFMA Youth World Championships, Siplyak trained vigorously around the clock for most of the summer to prepare. After arriving in Bangkok, accompanied by his parents and coach Rolando Montano, he began his training with Team USA, hosted by Khonsittha Muay Thai Gym. Team USA consisted of 4 certified USMF coaches and 12 fighters, including Joey.

In order to get a more in-depth perspective on the entire experience, I sat down with Joey and interviewed him.

CKC: You had two months to prepare for IFMA at home. Up until leaving for Thailand, what was your training schedule like?

Joey A: In the two months leading up to the IFMA, I would train Monday through Saturday with Coach Rolando. I would meet him every morning at 8 to go first to the gym to run and workout. We would then take a couple hours break, and would begin our first pad work session at 11 which would consist of 5x 5 minute rounds. Then usually in the later afternoon I would do 5 more 5 minute rounds, followed by either drilling , sparring, or more running. Altogether I was training about 4-5 hours a day while preparing for the IFMA in Thailand.

CKC: Wow! That is heavy training! Do you get to enjoy any of your summer vacation? Joey A. Yeah it was pretty heavy. CKC: How did you feel about spending almost all your summer in the gym? It didn’t bother me at all to spend my summer in the gym! Muay Thai is my passion and I love training and also teaching the sport. Anytime I am preparing for a fight, it’s very easy for me to put everything else on the side and focus on training. I just know I want to be a Muay Thai world champion, and I am willing to put the work in to get there without a second thought. Muay Thai is my life and I want to work every day to be the best fighter and coach I can be.

CKC: What was training at Khonsittha Muay Thai Gym with Team USA like? Can you give me a brief idea of what your training days looked like up until the first day of the tournament? Joey: A: Training there was so sick and I loved every minute of it, but it was also really tough as well. The training definitely felt more tough than back at home, and I think that was largely to the hot humid weather which I am not used to training in. And along with the weather, the heavy training schedule and pressure of representing Team USA in an international competition added to the overall difficulty for me. I could tell that everyone in the US Team training there meant business. Being around that kind of energy was very motivating for me as there is no better feeling than being around people who share the same passion for the sport, and are as determined as you are.

A typical training day at Khonsittha Muay Thai Gym would start with a 7 am run, followed by 12 minutes of jump rope, shadow boxing, 4 rounds of bag work, 4 rounds of pad work, and then abdominal/core work. We would have a few hours break and then start the afternoon training session at 3:30 pm. The structure of the evening was very similar, except instead of a run to start out we would do some advanced drilling that included clinch work and sparring.

CKC: Again… wow! That’s a lot of physical work, but also a fun and amazing experience. So, as far as the competition itself, from my understanding you lost your first match to decision which unfortunately knocked you out of the tournament. How did you feel about your fight over all? Joey: I didn’t fight well and I know I could have done better. I had a really tough opponent, I couldn’t find my groove and I felt out of range with everything I was throwing, but that is not an excuse. I guess I felt like I got my groove a bit in the 3rd round, and I knew I was down two rounds already, so I was determined to try to knockout my opponent in the 3rd round. I almost did too! All know is that I was losing but I was not out of the fight, and I kept fighting until the final bell. It was a learning experience for sure as loses tend to make you a better fighter, and I know how I can do better next time.

CKC: That’s quite a mature way to think. How did you feel about the tournament as whole? Joey A: It was an awesome experience! I learned a lot about myself, not only from my fight but watching the other fights. Being around so many people my age from all over the world, all competing in the same sport was such an amazing experience. It’s crazy to see the high level of competition that there is out there. So many of these kids are so much better than most professional fighters I know! I really can’t wait to go back and experience this again!

CKC: So that leads me to my final question. Although you didn’t do as good as you had hoped, will you try to compete in this tournament again? And if so, what will you do differently? How will you prepare? Joey A: Absolutely! I want to go back as many times as I can, and of course my goal is to win that gold medal! Like I said ealier about my fight, I was disappointed for sure in my performance, but don’t count me out as I will come back stronger! I know now what I need to do to prepare for this level of competition, and I will train harder and smarter for the next IFMA Competition in 2018. I plan on competing in all the big tournaments and fights in the USA in order to secure my spot again in the next IFMA Youth Muay Thai Championship.

After speaking with Joey about his experience at the tournament I wanted to grab a brief outside perspective from Coach Rolando.

CKC: Coach, how did you feel about the tournament overall? What were your thoughts on Joey’s experience there and what are your thoughts for the future?

Rolando A: It was a beautiful experience. It was a beautiful thing to see youth from all over the world participate in Muay Thai at the highest level on an Olympic-type stage! I love this sport so much, and it made me feel excited for the future of the sport to see so much talent. I do hope to see Muay Thai recognized as an official Olympic sport soon. By going with Joey to this tournament I gained a better understanding of the level of competition of youth around the world, and it is very impressive. I am proud of Joey for all the hard work and the heart he showed in his fight, and I know how we can adjust and improve our training regimen so that Joey can have an even better chance of achieving his goal to win a gold medal next year. As a coach and trainer I am motivated to improve personally, but also to improve all of our competitors at Carlsbad Kickboxing Club .

As a whole, Team USA was able to capture 6 medals: 3 gold, 2 bronze , and 1 silver medal. Bekah Irwin (Age 16) of Houston Muay Thai became the first American to win 2 gold medals and earned the Best Female Fighter award! Amazing job TEAM USA and amazing job to our own Joey Siplyak!

HOW THE VIBE OF A BOXING GYM CAN AFFECT YOU.

HOW THE VIBE OF A BOXING GYM CAN AFFECT YOU.

Good vibes are more than simply feeling that jab of positivity. Good vibes are about feeding off other people’s energy and having that sensation that something just feels right.

Although there are many cognitive explanations for why people pick up on negative cues or on positive cues, it actually goes deeper. According to scientific research, a person’s nervous system can pick up on chemical signals in any physical space—whether it be a boxing gym, a home, a work environment or any other space—and those signals ultimately have something to do with feeling a good vibe.

It is common knowledge that exercise will bring more happiness, enhanced mood and better self-esteem but what you might know is the the vibe of the place you are headed—whether it be a boot camp, a fitness gym and especially a boxing gym—is the key to that happiness.

Below are just a few ways the vibe at a boxing gym can affect you.

SPACE IS KEY: Have you ever been to a gym or boxing gym where it had the cardio, martial arts, yoga, boot camp, muay thai or whatever other combination of exercise you might have been looking for, but it gets super busy in the morning, and the group exercise classes are in the middle of the gym floor? You know you have, and it means that you have nowhere to stretch or complete strength sets when they take up all the room. That throws off the vibe so having your own personal space is essential.

DISTRACTION: If you are anything like me, you notice and are affected by everything when exercising in public. Whether the usual group of regulars aren’t there, it is too hot, one of the lights is out, or you are unable to get your favorite punching bag, it can throw off your entire routine. Not having a usual pattern, schedule and general goal or idea in mind of what you are getting yourself into can be a major workout killer.

MOTIVATION: It’s now about how much experience your coaches or trainers have. And it isn’t about how great they are (or claim to be). It is about surrounding yourself with fitness coaches and trainers that have confidence, can back up that confidence, and those who make you feel confident, provide motivation, and can push you to reach beyond the goals you have set for yourself.

If you are interested in checking out Carlsbad Kickboxing Gym, Click here to try a class for free to see it might just be the vibe you are looking for to pump up your fitness routine.

Carlsbad Kickboxing Club Trainer Arthur Barber, Uses Adversity to Fuel His Comeback.

Carlsbad Kickboxing Club Trainer Arthur Barber, Uses Adversity to Fuel His Comeback.

Adversity is a part of every athlete’s climb to the top. Arthur Barber’s journey is no different. The former football star who never dreamt of fighting for a living fell into this passion by chance but soon after discovered this is was his calling.

“I began training in 2015,” said Barber. “I never wanted to train Muay Thai or martial arts in general but since I was done with football my mother wanted me to do something constructive rather than waste talent.”

Barber, is a 21-year-old Muay Thai competitor living in Oceanside, California, and training at Carlsbad Kickboxing Club. His childhood wasn’t filled with beautiful weather, miles of beaches and high-end training facilities. Barber was born and raised in Southside, Chicago. Being one of seven children in an urban environment with a lack of educational and financial resources. However, the passion and determination Barber exhibits in the ring, quickly proves why he is now on the path to stardom.

However, stardom doesn’t come easily for even the most talented athletes. The road to the top is paved with many obstacles internally and externally. Thus far in Barbers short career, he has experienced both.

“In the beginning, it was easy to get discouraged,” said Barber. “I failed to realize motivation is like a drug. It’s very temporary it comes and goes as it pleases. So, the main goal is to stay disciplined and continue to be consistent with my daily training and healthy lifestyle choices.”

Waining motivation and internal questions were just a temporary hurdle for Barber to get over. Once he found his groove, he trained hard, fought hard and was rewarded with success in the ring. Barber took that same ferocity and focus to push himself to train for the US Muay Thai Open (USMTO) tournament.

Just when the path ahead of him seemed clear and he had the mindset and support needed to reach his new found goals, adversity reared it’s head once again in an unexpected fashion — one he nor his trainers could ever predict.

Ready to get after it and make a name for himself in the ring, Barber waiting patiently for his turn to prove himself, however, that turn would never come. Barber was disqualified when the tournament decided, for the first time, to start counting point kickboxing (PKB) fights, putting them towards a fighter’s ring record. PKB fights typically are not counted as real fights. Not being aware of this rule Barber had five PKB matches that weren’t added to his, in-the-ring record.

Though these rules were never previously disclosed to Barber or his training staff. At that moment everything went down the drain, the waking up early, uncomfortable eating schedule, rigorous training schedule; in an instance, it was all for nothing. This dealt a heavy blow to the fighter who put everything on the line for this opportunity.

“I cried, I cried hard. I sobbed out of anger and frustration,” said Barber. “All the sacrifices I ’d made to get to where I was, those sacrifices were cut short of my dream and I was labeled a cheater along with me and my coaches name being drug in the dirt. It was a nightmare for me and family.”

Though this news was a huge setback, in the grand scheme of things this will be a minor in the mind of Barber. He’s already set his focus on getting back to the place where he feels he deserves to be. Barber will now fight in A-class, competing against fighters who have two to three times the experience he has — but he’s ready and willing to show them this is where he belongs.

“I have to bring my heart and everything else I can in that ring to pull off those same wins this time around,” said Barber. “I’m hungrier than ever and after a year off, I mean business.”

Barber has big goals and aspiration and he plans on accomplishing them all. He’s training daily at Carlsbad Kickboxing Club, waiting for his opportunity to prove himself to the Muay Thai world. At this point, nothing can stop him, but himself and he sees himself with the championship the belt sooner than later.

“[In five-years] if not the champion of them all, I see myself as the #1 contender on multiple major Muay Thai and kickboxing promotions. I also see myself being a part of The USMF [United States Muay Thai Federation] competitive team, fighting and representing the country we call home. It’s one of those things I don’t think or hope about, I just know.”

Five Benefits of Boxing Workouts

Five Benefits of Boxing Workouts

Any time a person exercises or makes their muscles work in any way to burn calories, they will see health benefits both physically and mentally. Exercising can make you feel happier, can help with weight loss, can increase energy levels and build strong muscles. While there might not be proof that boxing is superior to any other types of exercise, thanks to the total body nature of it—the intensity and the combination of both resistance and cardio training—there is no denying that it is highly effective.

Read on to learn more about just five of the many benefits of boxing workouts.

Improved Total-Body Strength: If you have ever heard someone say that boxing is mostly an upper body workout, they are wrong (or are doing it wrong). Boxing is a full body workout that will improve your total-body strength. Think about it…muscles grow stronger when they meet resistance because it makes your body work harder than it normally does.

Better Hand-Eye Coordination, Stronger Mental Muscles: Boxing provides the ability to keep your eyes laser focused, while also teaching you split second reaction times. You learn how to take visual cues from someone else’s body movements, react, and counter with your own in a matter of seconds. Not only that, but it builds stronger mental muscles as well since the exercise provides a rush of endorphins.

Sense of Empowerment: Boxing isn’t just about getting stronger muscles. One of the biggest benefits to boxing is that it helps you to establish boundaries and imparts techniques like vocal tone, body language and verbal commands that can be especially useful. Boxing gives you that sense of intention that you might be looking for and provides you with that feeling that you are ready for anything the world throws at you.

Enhanced Cardiovascular Health, Improved Body Composition: Fitness boxing is a great aerobic exercise that will get your heart pumping and can help lower the risk of high blood pressure and overall, can enhance your cardiovascular health. In addition, it can strengthen your bones and muscles as it is a full-body workout. It engages the whole body—upper and lower—and allows you to stimulate muscle fibers that you might have never used before (especially the core and shoulders).

Decreased Stress, Increased Confidence: While hitting bag is a symbolic expression of relieving stress (or anger), physical activity in general is known as a stress reducer. Boxing is no different. When you are boxing, your brain increases the production of endorphins and helps relieve tension. In addition, boxing gives you confidence by helping build your self-esteem, build your stamina and overall conditioning. And if you are a boxer that also steps into the ring, you have no one to rely on except yourself—which shows you what you are made of.

Overall, boxing is highly effecting workout that requires power from your mind to your toes. Contact Carlsbad Kickboxing Club to learn more about how boxing can help you reach your fitness goals.

A Closer Look At Carlsbad Kickboxing Club’s Reily Allen

A Closer Look At Carlsbad Kickboxing Club’s Reily Allen

Carlsbad Kickboxing Club’s Reily Allen started Muay Thai when she was 13, just turning 14. Currently 17 years old and graduating high school in one month, we talked to Allen about her big plans for the future, overcoming obstacles and advice for young girls entering the sport.

Carlsbad Kickboxing Club: In the four years that you have been fighting, you have won 11 fights and won the 2015 IKF World Champion at age 15. What made you start Muay Thai in the first place?

Reily Allen: The reason I started the sport is because I want to become an FBI Agent in the future. When I was younger, I asked my dad what FBI Agents do for fighting and he gave me two options, one of them was Muay Thai. My first trainer ever was Rolando and after more than four years he is still my trainer.

CKC: How has Muay Thai impacted your life in the four years you have been fighting?

Allen: Muay Thai has impacted my life in the greatest ways. I definitely have matured greatly from it and as well as it’s made me see the world differently. I have a better view of what it’s like to be a fighter as well of all the hard things you go though and all the things you miss because you’re so dedicated to the sport.

CKC: What is the biggest obstacle you have faced in your boxing career and how have you overcome it?

Allen: Definitely losing confidence. Some fights just don’t go your way. I have learned that having confidence is key in Muay Thai because it is what makes you so great. To overcome this, I started sparring a lot and realized that I just messed up and that is ok. Everyone has room to grow. In addition, my team mates and trainers had my back and told me that I was something great and I believed it.

CKC: Tell me more about your future plans to become an FBI Agent and how Muay Thai has helped you in your career goals.

Allen: I plan to go to college after I graduate and still have the goal of becoming an FBI Agent. The sport has helped me prepare in many ways. It has taught me how to fight—so I already have self-defense under my belt. In addition, it has helped me mature a lot.

CKC: For those who say Muay Thai or boxing is a make sport, what would you say to young girls interested in fighting?

Allen: Girls can do everything that guys are capable of. I would tell those young girls to not ever let the statement of “only guys can do that” get in your way because you never know your true potential unless you try.”

CKC: On that note, what do you think will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of young girls following you?

Allen: The greatest challenge for the next generation of young girl is going to be making a career out of the sport. If you are good at Muay Thai or MMA you will be recognized because such few girls are good at fighting, so when one comes around, they really stand out.

If you are interested in checking out Carlsbad Kickboxing Gym, Click here to try a class for free to see it might just be the vibe you are looking for to pump up your fitness routine.

Joey Siplyak’s Muay Thai Technique Tutorial

Joey Siplyak’s Muay Thai Technique Tutorial

Have you ever wanted to learn more about Muay Thai or Boxing but perhaps a previous experience made you feel intimidated? Unfortunately, many gyms can be uninviting, but Carlsbad Kickboxing Club’s training regimen are designed to ensure that all members, from beginner to advanced, all have an equal and inviting training experience.

Nearly two years ago, the Club’s very own Joey Siplyak (who just 14 years old at the time) retained 2 championship titles in 2 different weight divisions. He is now 16 and an IFMA bronze medalist with 32 fights under his belt. We recently sat down with Siplyak to take a closer look at just a few techniques he uses that will help get you well on your way.

Carlsbad Kickboxing Club: For a muay thai or boxing newbies, instructors, fighters, and other students that might find it intimidating, what is your advice on how to get through it?

Siplyak: Work hard and train hard and if you set your mind to it, you can do it.

CKC: Do you need to be in shape to start training Muay Thai?

Siplyak: Not at all. While the conditioning drills might be challenging at first, over time, they will get easier. The sport of Muay Thai is more about skill and if you really focus on the techniques that are being taught, and have patience, getting in shape will eventually come naturally.

CKC: Does watching fights or shadowboxing help your technique?

Siplyak: You can definitely improve your skill set by watching other people fight. As for shadowboxing, it gives you the change to practice footwork, strikes, new combos and slow things down a bit. It also gives you a chance to fix your mistakes and keeps you from getting sloppy.

CKC: What is one thing I can do to be a better Muay Thai training partner?

Siplyak: Support each other—especially when your fellow fighters compete. Not only that, but learning to hold pads correctly can really help your partner.

CKC: What is one of the most useful Muay Thai techniques that you use?

Siplyak: Defense. Hands down. While using a wide range of skills are useful to having an arsenal of diverse attacks, you must know how to minimize the opponent’s efforts to land an attack.

Muay Thai Continues to Gain Global Popularity

Muay Thai Continues to Gain Global Popularity

Muay Thai Continues to Gain Global Popularity

Earlier this month, the St. Regis Bangkok unveiled the first thai boxing ring in a five-star Bangkok hotel. To coincide with the debut, the hotel also launched a wellness program incorporating training and dining experiences, developed by an on-staff expert and Executive Chef Chris Miller.

The St. Regis Bangkok is even offering its guests an on-staff thai boxing instructor, Boonsanong Borchae – Coach Jack – to provide an elevated training experience.

Steeped in tradition, thai boxing is known as the “Art of Eight Limbs” for its combined use of fists, elbows, knees and shins and according to Coach Jack—who also privately trains local celebrities and has more than 15 years of Thai boxing expertise—the training at the St. Regis will focus on precision and safety.

But the St. Regis move comes as no surprise since the national sport of Thailand has seen a growth of popularity over the past few years.

“Muay thai is really being reborn,” says Rolando Montano, host of the upcoming Muay Thai fight-night championship at Carlsbad Kickboxing Club on June 29th in San Diego.

According to Montano, owner of the Carlsbad Kickboxing Club, “what was once a dangerous sport—with no safety gear and cords basically wrapped around the fists in place of gloves—is now becoming a popularity fitness regime.”

He points out that UFC and social media have also really helped shine a light on the sport, and helped push its international respect. “Anyone from beginner to advanced can gain both physical and mental strength from it,” he adds. “The sport has raw simplicity and fitness attributes.”

To learn more about muay thai, check out Contact Carlsbad Kickboxing Club and see just why it is becoming so popular and can help you reach your goals.

Muay Thai Stage Ready for World Championships

Muay Thai Stage Ready for World Championships

Earlier this month, the St. Regis Bangkok unveiled the first thai boxing ring in a five-star Bangkok hotel. To coincide with the debut, the hotel also launched a wellness program incorporating training and dining experiences, developed by an on-staff expert and Executive Chef Chris Miller.

The St. Regis Bangkok is even offering its guests an on-staff thai boxing instructor, Boonsanong Borchae – Coach Jack – to provide an elevated training experience.

Steeped in tradition, thai boxing is known as the “Art of Eight Limbs” for its combined use of fists, elbows, knees and shins and according to Coach Jack—who also privately trains local celebrities and has more than 15 years of Thai boxing expertise—the training at the St. Regis will focus on precision and safety.

But the St. Regis move comes as no surprise since the national sport of Thailand has seen a growth of popularity over the past few years.

“Muay thai is really being reborn,” says Rolando Montano, host of the upcoming Muay Thai fight-night championship at Carlsbad Kickboxing Club on June 29th in San Diego.

According to Montano, owner of the Carlsbad Kickboxing Club, “what was once a dangerous sport—with no safety gear and cords basically wrapped around the fists in place of gloves—is now becoming a popularity fitness regime.”

He points out that UFC and social media have also really helped shine a light on the sport, and helped push its international respect. “Anyone from beginner to advanced can gain both physical and mental strength from it,” he adds. “The sport has raw simplicity and fitness attributes.”

To learn more about muay thai, check out Contact Carlsbad Kickboxing Club and see just why it is becoming so popular and can help you reach your goals.

Muay Thai Youth Programs Expand, Carlsbad Snags a Win!

Muay Thai Youth Programs Expand, Carlsbad Snags a Win!

In April of this year, the World Boxing Council launched a Muay Thai Youth Cares program in Japan, to inspire new generation boxers and help to expand that community around the world. The program is committed to the wellbeing of all youths who participate in the sport and through the program’s global network. The youth program aims to connect all likeminded youths participating in the sport and will allow the young boxers to share their interests, techniques, help each other through difficult times in life and inspire each other.

And in late June, the program actually showcased those same sporting values in Moscow where a host of young Russian Muaythai enthusiasts gathered with former WBC Muaythai champions to showcase the ancient tradition of the Wai Kru ceremony (pictured here).

Mr. Fabio Chinda, Minister of the Royal Thai Embassy to the Russian Federation, also in attendance at the event stated, “In Thailand, the martial art of muay thai has existed throughout the country’s long history and has evolved over centuries to become one of Thailand’s national sports, a source of pride for the entire nation, and a mesmerizing art that captures the hearts of people from all around the world, including here in Russia. The number of muay thai activities, competitions, and training camps spread across more than 80 regions of Russia, has proven that Russian people shared affection for muay thai, and I sincerely hope that muay thai, as a sport and cultural art, will continue to link our people and nations.”

As mentioned earlier one of our blog, the sport of muay thai is quickly becoming a global phenomenon, but both boxing clubs and muay thai gyms around the world are expanding and focusing more and more on educating and training today’s youth.

Carlsbad Kickboxing Club, for one, covers the art of 8 limbs in a safe kid’s program geared to teach leg kicks, knees, clinching and elbows, and, like the WBC MuayThai Youth Cares Program, the idea is to convey positivity, confidence, togetherness in sport, and inclusion among the world’s Muay Thai youth community.

One of the gym’s own, Arthur Morev, just recently won the YDL belt at the recent TBA Classic Muay Thai World Expo in Iowa. According to his coach, “he has gone from a shy guy not wanting to do muay thai to a confident young champion with the help is his trainer.”

The kids’ program at Carlsbad Kickboxing Club is committed to establishing measurable results like Morev’s and is also dedicated to providing every student with the most positive training atmosphere possible.

Click here to try a class for free.

Largest Number of Athletes To Participate in IFMA World Championships

Largest Number of Athletes To Participate in IFMA World Championships

The official press conference recently took place at the Sport Authority of Thailand to reveal the 2019 IFMA World Championships and the final number of teams and participants.

IFMA President Dr. Sakchye Tapsuan made a heartfelt speech that “Muay thai is coming home” after years of World Championships outside the Kingdom. He also stated that he is honored that the largest number of athletes and national federations will participate.

According to IFMA director, Charissa Tynan, this is more than a world championship. It is a cultural and sporting exchange with many commission meetings and also it is election year, Tynan said in a prepared press statement.

IFMA General Secretary and GAISF Vice President, Stephan Fox, continued to highlight the fact of IFMA’s close cooperation with the sporting world and many leaders of recognized sporting federations will come.

Kajorn Prowsri, representing the Amateur Muay Thai Association of Thailand stated that this event has all the support of Thailand and that two royal trophies have been donated for best male and female team. The National Olympic Committee of Thailand has given full patronage and that Thailand is extremely proud that the International Olympic Committee will also make an official visit at the event.

Muay Thai is quickly becoming a global phenomenon and cultural exchange, like Tynan said at the press conference. As Carlsbad Kickboxing Club recently wrote, the sport is really being reborn and is now becoming a popular fitness regime across the world.

Click here to try a class for free and see how you can get involved in the sport.

New IFMA Elections and Russia Takes the World Championship Win

New IFMA Elections and Russia Takes the World Championship Win

Many VIPS recently traveled to Bangkok recently to be part of the IFMA 2019 elections. The three main positions of stood unopposed and the General Assembly unanimously elected and confirmed Dr. Sakchye Tapsuwan as IFMA President, Stephan Fox and Secretary General and Charissa Tynan as Director. In addition, the unification of IFMA and WMC, Somsak Lesawatrakul was voted in as VP of IFMA, together with the five heads of the Continental Federations. The last VP position will be elected by the Executive Committee at its next meeting. All the commissions are now confirming their representatives for the Committee.

At the elections, special presentations were also made on upcoming events in 2020 & 2021 namely the World Combat Games and World Games. UTS CEO Julia Govinden made a report on United Through Sports and the ongoing cooperation with IFMA.

In other news, 102 participating countries recently came to the IFMA World Championships 2019 at the end of July. This year was the biggest in the history of IFMA.

The final competition days were heated between the three leading teams, the home country Thailand, Russia and Ukraine. The atmosphere in the stadium was electrifying especially if Russia would win as this would be the first time the trophy would move outside of Thailand. After the closing bouts it was team Russia which came out victorious winning the overall elite division with team Thailand coming second.

If you or anyone you know are interested in learning more about the sport of muay thai, check out Carlsbad Kickboxing Club for more details on how to get involved.

Muay Thai Stage Ready for World Championships.

Muay Thai Stage Ready for World Championships.

The official venue of the World Muaythai Championships, The Sports Authority of Thailand will soon become one of the biggest muaythai sites.

Three competition rings, fan zone, expo-zone and entertainment will be set and will take over the main sports facility of Thailand from 20 to 29 July, according to a prepared statement from the World Muaythai Council.

Extensive presentations were made by the local organizing committee at the weekly meeting with the Amateur Association of Thailand with diagrams and proposals to make this event one of the most memorable and present the Thai sports hub to the international teams, the release said.

“There is no better place to present the sport as the main office of all recognized sports and the National Olympic Committee,” said IFMA President Dr. Sakchye Tapsuwan. “So many historical events took place here and the World Muaythai Championships will write another chapter in the history of SAT.”

To learn more about Muay thai, check out Carlsbad Kickboxing Club and try a class free.

Siplyak Heads to Turkey to Bring Gold Back to Carlsbad Kickboxing Club

Siplyak Heads to Turkey to Bring Gold Back to Carlsbad Kickboxing Club

Friends and members of Carlsbad Kickboxing Club came out Friday night for an In House Fighting Night fundraiser. The event was created to help support the Club’s own Joey Siplyak’s upcoming trip to Turkey.

There, Siplyak will be competing for the Gold Medal in the IFMA World Youth Muay Thai Championships Tournament. Held from September 28 to October 6th, this year’s event will bring the IFMA back to Antalya, the gateway to Turkey’s southern Mediterranean region, known as the Turquoise Coast for its blue waters.

According to an IFMA press release, Turkey once again will set the stage for what is sure to be another great tournament and event that will see not only the youth muay thai tournament in all junior divisions, but also the championships of Wai Kru, Muay Boran and Muay Talay.

Two yeas ago, Joey Siplyak (who just 14 years old at the time) retained 2 championship titles in 2 different weight divisions. He is now 16 and an IFMA bronze medalist with 34 fights under his belt.

When previously asked what his advice is to new fighters in the sport, he said it is to work hard and train hard. “If you set your mind to it, you can do it,” he says.

2019 IFMA Youth World Championships Roundup

2019 IFMA Youth World Championships Roundup

The USMF brought one of the largest USA Muaythai teams to the 2019 IFMA Youth World Championships in Turkey. This year’s event was in Antalya, the gateway to Turkey’s southern Mediterranean region, known as the Turquoise Coast for its blue waters.

Turkey once again set the stage for what was another great tournament and event. The event concluded with an award night which revealed new names in the youth elite. The personal awards went to Ukraine, Australia, Moldova, Malaysia, Netherlands and many other countries.

Under the guidance of Rami Ibrahim and other coaches of the USMF—including Carlsbad Kickboxing Club’s own Rolando Montano—the USA team brought home three gold medals, four silver medals, and nine bronze medals.

USA’s Neil Zelinsky won Muay Talay Champion. The Muay Talay tournament has really become an integral part of each Youth World Muaythai Championships and medals for the muay thai On Water are treated with the importance of the main competition. IFMA director Charissa Tynan said that compared to last year this event, it was at least two times bigger.

Tierra Brandt was awarded 3rd place for the Best 16-17-year-old Athlete. She leaves the youth events in a status of the two times world champion with flawless record in IFMA events of 7 victories and 0 losses.

Outstanding Female Athlete (over 14) went to USA’s Nicole Fernandez.

The Lebanese female athletes also made an outstanding contribution towards the team result as Maya Kalash and Sirene Hadara became the world champions.

Carlsbad Kickboxing Club’s own Joey Siplyak was there representing the United States and beat Uzbekistans Shakhriyor Askaraliev, however, he lost a close match to Ravan Aghazada of Azerbijuan. Siplyak certainly held his own against an opponent with over 140 recorded wins we expect big things still come.

In the end, Mykyta Goncharenko (UKR – 16 -17 Male Youth -60kg) entered his first and last Youth World Muaythai Championships with a bang as he celebrated winning the gold medal in Antalya. Next year he will turn 18.

Athletes Prepare for Upcoming 2019 Asian Championships,Local Fights.

Athletes Prepare for Upcoming 2019 Asian Championships,Local Fights.

Athletes from more than 30 countries will travel to the UAE capital Abu Dhabi to participate in the 2019 Asian Championships coming up from December 16-22, which is also a qualification event on the road to the 2021 World Games.

The UAE Muay Thai Federation and the government is in full preparation to make the event an everlasting experience for the athletes and in muay thai community, according to a prepared release. The release also states that this is not just a muay thai event, as there will be conferences, forums and cultural activities.

Abu Dhabi will host Elite Men’s and Women’s divisions which will give 100% top muay thai show for all spectators at the stadium and viewers on TV, the release notes.

With UAE successful performance in recent years the organizers promise full house every day as local athletes became famous for their victories at the international competitions. The FAMA President Karim Massimov recently congratulated the chairman of the UAE Muaythai H.E. Abdullah Saeed Amer Al Neyadi on hosting Asian Muaythai Championships 2019 and said that the level of Muaythai in Asia has truly grown making equal competition for any team in the world and continental tournaments.

It was also recently a historical moment in Bangkok at the IFMA Executive Board Meeting when IFMA President Dr. Sakchye Tapsuwan and Executive Director if the UAE Muaythai Mr. Tareq Mohamed Al Mehairi signed the agreement marking the countdown to the event.

We look forward to seeing who comes out on top in the upcoming event.

Back home, here in the United States, Carlsbad Kickboxing Club will be hosting its IKF-PKB Muay Thai Kickboxing semi-contact event for both adult and junior levels Saturday, December 7th. Click here to register.